libutron
libutron:

Scarlet Macaw’s feathers: a priceless source of genetic and ecological information
The molted feathers from scarlet macaws, Ara macao (Psittacidae), are sources of small amounts of DNA, so George Olah, a biologist from the Australian National University, is using DNA markers to monitor wildlife populations of this splendid bird in the area of potential impact of the massive road that in 2011 connected the ports of Brazil to the shipping docks of Peru.
For Olah, insights into his macaw study population are hidden in the colorful feathers the macaws left behind. Olah and his colleagues extract that genetic material, and then amplify it. Each DNA sample from a feather contains a genetic tag unique to the bird from which the feather came.
By collecting feathers and sequencing their DNA, the researchers can build a picture of individual birds’ movements through their habitat. Finding samples from the same individuals or families in the landscape can tell researchers where these birds move, how far from their nests they fly, or where evidence of their presence can’t be found.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Giovanni Mari | Locality: Tambopata National Reserve, Peru

libutron:

Scarlet Macaw’s feathers: a priceless source of genetic and ecological information

The molted feathers from scarlet macaws, Ara macao (Psittacidae), are sources of small amounts of DNA, so George Olah, a biologist from the Australian National University, is using DNA markers to monitor wildlife populations of this splendid bird in the area of potential impact of the massive road that in 2011 connected the ports of Brazil to the shipping docks of Peru.

For Olah, insights into his macaw study population are hidden in the colorful feathers the macaws left behind. Olah and his colleagues extract that genetic material, and then amplify it. Each DNA sample from a feather contains a genetic tag unique to the bird from which the feather came.

By collecting feathers and sequencing their DNA, the researchers can build a picture of individual birds’ movements through their habitat. Finding samples from the same individuals or families in the landscape can tell researchers where these birds move, how far from their nests they fly, or where evidence of their presence can’t be found.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Giovanni Mari | Locality: Tambopata National Reserve, Peru

themanicpixiedreamgrrrl

"My response to the “I am not a feminist” internet phenomenon….

First of all, it’s clear you don’t know what feminism is. But I’m not going to explain it to you. You can google it. To quote an old friend, “I’m not the feminist babysitter.”

But here is what I think you should know.

You’re insulting every woman who was forcibly restrained in a jail cell with a feeding tube down her throat for your right to vote, less than 100 years ago.

You’re degrading every woman who has accessed a rape crisis center, which wouldn’t exist without the feminist movement.

You’re undermining every woman who fought to make marital rape a crime (it was legal until 1993).

You’re spitting on the legacy of every woman who fought for women to be allowed to own property (1848). For the abolition of slavery and the rise of the labor union. For the right to divorce. For women to be allowed to have access to birth control (Comstock laws). For middle and upper class women to be allowed to work outside the home (poor women have always worked outside the home). To make domestic violence a crime in the US (It is very much legal in many parts of the world). To make workplace sexual harassment a crime.

In short, you know not what you speak of. You reap the rewards of these women’s sacrifices every day of your life. When you grin with your cutsey sign about how you’re not a feminist, you ignorantly spit on the sacred struggle of the past 200 years. You bite the hand that has fed you freedom, safety, and a voice.

In short, kiss my ass, you ignorant little jerks.”

Libby Anne (via newwavenova)